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2 edition of Primary production, detritus flux, and nutrient cycling in a sedge marsh, Fraser River estuary found in the catalog.

Primary production, detritus flux, and nutrient cycling in a sedge marsh, Fraser River estuary

R. U. Kistritz

Primary production, detritus flux, and nutrient cycling in a sedge marsh, Fraser River estuary

by R. U. Kistritz

  • 379 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Westwater Research Centre, University of British Columbia in Vancouver .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Salt marsh ecology -- British Columbia -- Fraser River Estuary.,
  • Estuarine plants -- British Columbia -- Fraser River Estuary.,
  • Carex lyngbyei hornem.,
  • Fraser River Estuary (B.C.)

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 50-53.

    Statementby R. U. Kistritz and I. Yesaki.
    SeriesTechnical report - Westwater Research Centre ; no. 17
    ContributionsYesaki, I.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvii, 53 p. :
    Number of Pages53
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15169007M

    estuary and suggest recommendations for reducing nu-trient inputs to estuary waters. Learning Objectives Students will be able to: 1. Understand how water quality and nutrient parameters in an estuary can indicate disruptions to ecological processes in File Size: 1MB. Much of the steadily expanding research of the 60s and 70s focused on the role of marsh production (Kibby et al. ), nutrient flux, and detrital export in estuarine ecosystems (Nixon ). Research soon suggested a linkage between marsh production and offshore commercial fisheries (Turner ).

    Geoscience Australia conducted a survey to measure the benthic nutrient fluxes in Wallis Lake, during February The objectives of the survey were: 1. To measure the nutrient and other metabolite fluxes across the sediment-water interface at sites in Pipers Creek, Muddy Creek, Wallis Creek and in the Central Basin of Wallis Lake 2. marsh vegetation on the Little Qualicum River estuary (here-after, LQRe) became apparent. Many of the changes appeared to coincide with increasing numbers of resident Canada Geese (Fig. 1). The term ‘resident’ refers to the exotic Canada Geese deliberately introduced to Vancouver Island, the ma-.

    The Swan River estuary development, management and preservation. The Swan River Conservation Board, Western Australia. Robson, B. J., and Hamilton, D. P. (). Summer flow event induces a cyanobacterial bloom in a seasonal Western Australian estuary. Cited by:   Depth Matters in Peat Bog Nutrient Cycling. Peatlands store around a third of Earth’s soil carbon, and a new study begins to reveal how the ecosystems’ organic matter changes with : David Shultz.


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Primary production, detritus flux, and nutrient cycling in a sedge marsh, Fraser River estuary by R. U. Kistritz Download PDF EPUB FB2

Net annual primary production of a sedge Carex lyngbyei dominated tidal marsh in the Fraser River estuary, British Columbia, Canada was g ash-free dry weight (AFDW) and nutrient cycling in a sedge marsh m2 per yr ( g dry weight per m2 per yr). Mean maximum shoot elongation during the short (May to August) growing season was cm per day from overwintering shoots.

The maximum aboveground Cited by:   Primary production, detritus flux, and nutrient cycling in a sedge marsh, Fraser River estuary. Technical Rep Westwater Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia. Google ScholarCited by: Primary production, detritus flux, and nutrient cycling in a sedge marsh, Fraser River estuary.

Westwater Research Centre Tech. Rep. University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Kistritz, R. and I. Yesaki. Primary production, detritus flux flux and nutrient cycling in a sedge marsh, Fraser River estuary. Technical Rep Westwater Research Center, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Google ScholarCited by: The dynamics of primary production and particulate detritus cycling in the Columbia River Estuary are described, with particular reference to mechanisms that account for patterns within the water column, on the tidal flats, and in the adjacent wetlands.

of g dry weight m-2 recorded in a Carex-dominated tidal marsh in the Fraser River Cited by: Start studying Marine Bio Mod 5. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Search.

- plants growing in the estuary such as salt marsh or mangrove. - Have access to water column primary production and shallow water production. Nutrient cycling and plant dynamics in estuaries: A brief review Mogens R.

Flindt a, Miguel Ângelo Pardal b*, Ana Isabel Lillebø b, Irene Martins b, João Carlos Marquesb a Freshwater Biological Laboratory, University of Copenhagen, Helsingørsg Dk Hillerød, Denmark. b IMAR (Institute of Marine Research), Department of Zoology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.

Corbett: Resuspension and estuarine nutrient cycling Figure 2. Fig. Sampling locations in the Neuse River Estuary were selected over various salinities, ranging from oligohaline to mesohaline en-vironments.

Stations are numbered with the lowest number Cited by: Additionally, microalgal production on marsh surfaces is important (Ribelin & Collier, ; Rublee, ). This represents a primary production source in addition to macrophytes that might be exported. Finally, Howarth & Hobbie () speculate that chemosynthetic bacterial production is large: another source of microbial biomass.

Primary production: The detritus pathway. The knowledge on macrophyte production is well established but only a little is known about the fate of the production. Although, some birds are reported to graze on rooted macrophytes, the grazing is seldom extensive in temperate areas.

Instead, the leafs are sloughed with ageing or at the end Cited by: Construction of a river training dyke at Squamish, B.C., has resulted in strong salinity, water transparency, and sedimentation gradients across the estuary face which have significantly affected.

Detritus is a mixture of non-living particulate organic material and the attached microorganisms, which act to decompose (or remineralize) the material.A variety of plant materials contribute to detritus in estuaries, including marsh vegetation, phytoplankton, benthic microalgae, submerged aquatic vegetation, macroalgae and terrestrial vegetation.

b) The herbivore is the marsh periwinkle, and it migrates up and down the stems of Spartina to access the salt pans in order to feed. c) The herbivore is the marsh periwinkle, and it migrates up and down the stalks of Spartina to stay above the tideline where it will remain out of the reach of predators.

Dynamics of Ecosystem Metabolism and Flocculent Detritus Transport in Estuarine Taylor River systems, exhibiting high rates of primary production that fuel offshore secondary production. Hydrological processes play a central role in shaping estuarine ecosystem.

Wetland species were mostly present in tributaries to the Colorado River and in off-river springs (Stevens et al., ).Yearly flood events ceased when dam was installed and river flow was controlled.

This led to the buildup of fine sediments in the river and the formation of reattachment bars, as well as the loss of vegetation scouring events.

NW-ient cycling in a freshwater marsh: The decomposition of fish and waterfowl carrion Robert R. Parmenter Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87 13 1 Vincent A.

Lamarra Ecosystem Research Institute, Logan, Utah AbstractCited by: At least ha of the Sturgeon Bank low marsh in the Fraser River delta died off between and Humans have heavily modified the Fraser River estuary since the late ’s, including installing a series of jetties throughout the leading edge of the delta to train the course of the river.

I established a reciprocal transplant Author: Eric Balke. Sediment biogeochemistry was studied in the Huon estuary, which is located in Southern Tasmania, Australia.

The sources of organic matter and rates of decomposition were investigated as well as fluxes of nutrients, which are liberated during organic matter decomposition. The study aimed to develop a conceptual understanding of benthic respiration and nutrient cycling in the Huon estuary and Author: DC Thomson.

The grazed marsh had higher soil carbon density and belowground production, yet lower aboveground biomass. Grazing reduces plant litter and increases solar exposure, soil temperature (at this latitude, soil remained frozen until April) and evapotranspiration, thus raising soil salinity and nitrogen demand, the latter a driver of root by: floating leaf, low marsh, middle marsh, high marsh, and shrub marsh (Fig.

These habitats occur along a linear environmental gradient (Pas­ ternack et al. in preparation). Water flow in the marsh is controlled primarilyby astronomical tides and meteorological forcing, and in the riparian forest by runofffrom the km2 Winters Run basin.

and optimization of processes. The system shows a perfect cycling of carbon and the rate of withdrawal is equal to the return keeping the system in balance. About m moles l-1 is withdrawn from the reservoir for primary production each day and returned back through respiration and decomposition.Feedbacks between inundation, root production, and shoot growth in a rapidly submerging brackish marsh Matthew L.

Kirwan1* and Glenn R. Guntenspergen2 1Department of Environmental Science, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VAUSA; and 2Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, US Geological Survey, Laurel, MDUSACited by: primary productivity, therefore depth related light climates determine where species are most productive.

Wide ranges in light climates are present in the Swan-Canning estuary. The estuary is more than 20 m deep in some sections (e.g. Blackwall Reach).

There are also extensive shallow sections of the estuary where water depths are less than 2 m.